“Free the Phones” – Are the Phone Pockets Helping?

Are keeping the phones in the phone pockets helping the students?

how+addictive+are+phones+to+students
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“Free the Phones” – Are the Phone Pockets Helping?

how addictive are phones to students

how addictive are phones to students

how addictive are phones to students

how addictive are phones to students

Amulya Chirravuri, Writer

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Many kids and teachers in Franklin High have different opinions on keeping the phones in phone pocket and away from students. some students say it increases stress while teachers believe it benefits the participation in class.

Some kids say if helps reduce the urge to look and distract oneself from it and other like to argue that they use phones to last minute studying using apps like Quizlet, either way most kids responded to a survey that they would rather have a no phone policy like before where they were allowed to have on them but not be able to use unless told so. the overall opinion of students is simply put “free the phones”,one kid responded when asked about phone pockets.

In a similar vein, educators say “the phone has become like an extra appendage.” They want students to pay attention in class, something they can’t do if they’re fixated on Instagram or Snapchat. Some students have no idea how many times they check their phones, they might want to pick it up to check one thing which turns into 3 hours of snapping people or watching Tiktok.

Jean Twenge, a professor of psychology at San Diego State University, believes that smartphones are dangerous to teens. “At first, when I saw these trends in loneliness and unhappiness and depression starting to spike around 2011 or 2012, I really had no idea what could possibly be causing that. It was a real mystery,” she mentions to an interviewer from NPR.

Twenge also notes that young people who report spending the most time on smartphones — five to seven hours a day — are twice as likely to report being depressed as those who use their phones for one to two hours a day. Twenge isn’t claiming to have proved that smartphones cause depression, but she knows that teens should limit their time on their phones and social media.

All in all phone use-age could be reduced in your day to day life to maintain a healthy yet still social lifestyle.

 

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