Rich World Problem #87942: Steve Jobs Died

Rachita Chaudhury and Rachita Chaudhury

Steve Jobs, the founder of Apple, died on October 5th and there has been non-stop, overrated hype over his influence ever since. Steve Jobs was unknown to many proud “i” product owners before falling sick. Yet many have been acting as if they have been personally traumatized.

Did you know?

According to multiple sources including biography.com, Steve Jobs refused to acknowledge his illegitimate daughter as his child for 2 years.

Steve Jobs rarely gave to charity according to laobserved.com and forbes.com.

Steve Jobs was often rude and disrespectful according to 37signals.com and ubuntu forums.org.

I do not mean to attack Jobs, but rather the wrongly based spotlight we have put him under.

Now, have you ever heard of Bill Gates?

He is the chairman of Microsoft. For more than a decade, he has been one of the world’s wealthiest people, yet we don’t see him in the media. He wrote codes alongside his employees when he could have just been managing them. He has given to charity multiple times.

Gates said he would miss his partner and rival, Steve Jobs, immensely.

While Jobs did provide a huge game-changer in the world of technology, did he really live up to the role model pedestal we have put him on? I say no.

As it is commonly noted, “One person dying is a tragedy, but a thousand people dying is a statistic”. One man’s death has been exploited by the media causing people to take the unfortunate event far beyond what it should be.

It is sad that Steve Jobs died after his struggle with pancreatic cancer, but death does not earn him the title of an exemplary man. There are so many others out there who continue to do things more beneficial to us than Apple and they will pass on unnoticed. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy iPods, iPads, and iPhones, but I’m not ready to set up a shrine to this man like many others have done or are close to doing. Lighten up on the weeping folks; it is far from the end of the world.