Why is Twitter the new Facebook?

Why is Twitter the new Facebook?

Does our generation get bored so easily that we can entirely shift our primary social network usage?

Caroline Cafasso

If you are involved in social networking, then you have probably recognized the evolution occurring in the online world. Facebook used to be the “in” way to receive updates from your friends. Now, it is clear that teeangers have taken over Twitter, causing Facebook to no longer reign supreme. But, is this change really accurate? And if so, why?

As of September 14h, Facebook reached 1 billion monthly active users. With the numbers continuously growing, how is possible that Twitter, which made its 500 millionth user mark this past June (including the many fake spam accounts), seems to be more popular than Facebook? It is best to only speak in terms of Franklin High School. Out of the entire world, teenagers like us are not the majority. While it may seem like tweeting is #1, the same cannot be said for the rest of the world. But, at least for FHS students, what makes Twitter so much better than Facebook to us?

“I like it because you have direct contact with anyone, even your favorite celebrities. It just seems a lot more convenient,” said Jess Ward, sophomore. One significant difference between the two social networks is the type of connection. Twitter is much more simple in the sense that you can “follow” any user of your choice with just the touch of a button. While not receiving a “follow back,” can be offending, it hurts a lot less than an unaccepted request on Facebook.

With Twitter, you can have the tweets Charlie Sheen, Barack Obama, and Lindsay Lohan, along with all your friends, all in one place.  It only takes a few seconds to tweet, and only another few seconds to see a huge variety of users’ tweets. “I can follow people who work in the industry that I want to work in,” said junior Jeffrey Roy. “It helps me to know what I need to do in order to get to where they are.”

Sophomore Steve Hayes prefers Twitter as well, citing it as less “annoying” than Facebook. “You don’t have to see annoying pictures all the time. If you want to see the picture, you go to the tweet.” The design of Twitter seems to be a much more appealing layout. Tweets have a maximum of 140 characters, and photos appear as links, as opposed to being visible with the post. The Facebook newsfeed is clunky and cumbersome in comparison to a quicker to read Twitter format.

The consensus seems to be clear: for teenagers, Twitter has ousted Facebook. I, personally, cannot help but feel a little sad at this fact. I think we can all remember the days where Facebook seemed like the coolest thing to ever exist. Now, it’s just a thing in the past for us teenagers. If it is possible for Facebook, a social networking powerhouse, to become too boring for our technology-centered generation, then even Twitter can have a downfall of its own. And if that happens, then what’s next?